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The Telegram
  • Children work with electricity at Basloe Library

  • Several children and their families gathered at Frank J. Basloe Library last Friday to experience a hands-on activity working with electricity.

    Jen Herzog, an assistant professor of biology at Herkimer County Community College, presented the program.

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  • Several children and their families gathered at Frank J. Basloe Library last Friday to experience a hands-on activity working with electricity.
    Jen Herzog, an assistant professor of biology at Herkimer County Community College, presented the program.
    “Today’s program will demonstrate electricity currents and the students will use snap circuit kits which will allow them to work with an electrical circuit and prove their hypothesis,” she said.
    Herzog said she teaches several hands-on activities that incorporate science at the Oneida Public Library and she is starting to reach out to area schools such as St. Francis de Sales to help students from kindergarten to sixth grade explore and better understand several topics that are part of the science core curriculum.
    “I really like to help the students learn and understand science and by stepping in and teaching I can also give other teachers that extra helping hand,” Herzog said.
    During the program the children learned about different types of electricity including static, flowing and chemical electricity.
    Herzog also performed an experiment along with the children to show how Triboluminesence, the process of smashing something to produce electricity, works.
    Everyone was handed a Life Saver spearmint mint and Herzog turned off the lights and told the children to chomp down and chew the Life Saver quickly to see an ultraviolet blue light appear as they chewed.
    After the experiment the children were able to take part in a hands-on electrical circuit activity using snap circuits.
    Herzog said the circuits are a form of chemical electricity powered by battery.
    “An electrical current is made up of electrons that like to move at a constant flow like a racecar driving around a racetrack and in order for the electricity to keep flowing an electrical path must be connected,” she said.
    While using the electrical snap kits the children could create their own electrical current to make light bulbs light and power objects to fly.
    “My favorite part of today was being able to build my own electrical circuit and seeing blue sparks in my mouth while chewing a mint,” said James Longwell, a second grade student at Fisher Elementary School in Mohawk.
    Erin Sanchez, a mother of three from Herkimer, decided to bring her children to the event after receiving a flyer about the program from St. Francis de Sales.
    “Since the children are off I decided attending the program would make for a fun experimental day out,” Sanchez said.
    Pat Talerico, of Utica, brought her three grandchildren to the event, but in the end it was her husband, Tony, who enjoyed playing with the circuits as much as the children.
    “He’s really likes to work with the kids and help them and I think the reason he likes this so much is because we didn’t have this kind of technology to work with when we were kids,” she said.
    Page 2 of 2 - “When I was young we had a Heathkit, but it wasn’t for kids it was for adults, so it’s nice the kids have something that helps them to learn and allows them to play at the same time,” Tony Talerico said.
    Pat Talerico’s daughter, Valerie, also went on the family outing with her niece, nephew and two-year old son.
    “He’s a little young to take part in the activity right now, but I really wanted to come down because I had never seen the library here and it’s really nice and the program was great for the kids,” she said.
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