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The Telegram
  • Debris to be removed from Frankfort site

  • The Frankfort village board voted at Thursday's meeting to have the pile of debris from a demolished building removed as soon as possible and the site cleaned up. Several South Frankfort Street residents were on hand for the meeting to ask when the debris from the building at 202 S. Frankfort St. would be rem...
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  • The Frankfort village board voted at Thursday's meeting to have the pile of debris from a demolished building removed as soon as possible and the site cleaned up.
    Several South Frankfort Street residents were on hand for the meeting to ask when the debris from the building at 202 S. Frankfort St. would be removed. Mayor Frank Moracco declared a state of emergency on July 27 and ordered the building taken down after receiving reports one of the floors had collapsed and inspecting the building with other officials. Once it was determined the building was a hazard, he ordered that it be demolished.
    “I know the first step was taken,” said Mike DeRollo and he thanked village officials for their quick response to the emergency, but he asked what the next step would be.
    “As neighbors, we're very concerned. It should be cleaned up,” he said.
    DeRollo and his wife, Dorri, also wanted to know when their driveway would be accessible again. They have had to park on the street because of the debris in their driveway.
    When the issue came up later in the meeting, Moracco outlined the costs associated with the work. He said the cost of demolishing the building, filling in the cellar with hard fill and adding sand and soil and seeding the property would be $18,000. A state permit process, which could take up to two weeks, would add another $2,000. There is a $3,000 fee for air quality monitoring during the removal process and a $2,000 fee for the double lined dumpsters that will be needed. The cost of hauling the debris to the dumping site adds another $10,000, bringing the cost to $35,000.
    In addition, there is a $95 per ton tipping fee, although the mayor said a payment plan could be worked out with the Oneida-Herkimer Solid Waste Authority so payments could be made during a three- to four-year period.
    He plans to apply to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance in paying for the project because the heavy rains brought the building to a state of collapse.
    Moracco asked village board members for their opinions on what should be done and all three trustees present agreed the debris should be removed and the site cleaned up.
    “We can't leave it the way it is,” said Trustee Michael Entwistle. “We need to do the right thing.”
    Deputy Mayor Richard Adams and Trustee Mark Harris also voted to remove the debris and clean up the site as soon as possible.
    Trustee Anthony Fumarola was absent.
    Moracco said the request for the necessary permit has already been filed and he anticipated the removal of debris would not take more than a week.
    Village Superintendent Ron Vivacqua said village crews would clean up the DeRollos' driveway and make sure it was free of nails so they could get their car off the street. He said while village officials don't know if there was asbestos in the building, the site would be treated as if there were. Given the frequent rain, he did not think there would be an issue with the asbestos, but when the debris is being removed the air quality will be monitored and neighbors will be asked to keep their windows closed.
    Page 2 of 2 - The village had looked into having the building at 202 S. Frankfort St. torn down earlier this year, but rejected the bids as too costly. Moracco said the process was also stalled because the property had nine liens against it.
    No one has lived in the apartment building for several years and neighbors have complained about its condition.
    Mike DeRollo asked at Thursday's meeting if someone could purchase the property. Moracco said if the village receives reimbursement from FEMA, the property would be “forever green” and no one could purchase it.
    “The most we could have on it would be grass, a park bench and a little light,” he said.
    Codes enforcer James Staffo reported there are two other buildings he is concerned about, but he wants to contact the owners before taking any action. Both owners live in the area.
    Moracco said some abandoned properties are being left with the utilities still on. When anyone sees a building that has apparently been abandoned, he said, “a red flag should go off and you should notify the utilities department right away.”
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