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The Telegram
  • Local communities brace for more flooding

  • The threat of more heavy rain had area residents and emergency crews on edge Tuesday afternoon.

    “We’re in defensive mode,” said Herkimer Deputy Chief Jim Woodrick. “We’re filling sandbags to divert the water if necessary.”

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  • The threat of more heavy rain had area residents and emergency crews on edge Tuesday afternoon.
    “We’re in defensive mode,” said Herkimer Deputy Chief Jim Woodrick. “We’re filling sandbags to divert the water if necessary.”
    Firefighters were on standby. There are people without power, without gas and with no hot water in the community, he said.
    “We’re operating on not too many hours of sleep and it’s getting to be a very emotional time. We’re concerned about each other, our families and our communities,” said Woodrick.
    He said there is concern about the status of Hinckley Reservoir. On Monday night there were alerts sent out that a flood control levy in Herkimer may have been compromised.
    The town and village of Frankfort were dealing with floods and damaged roads.
    Moyer Creek spilled over its banks Monday night forcing Frankfort firefighters to evacuate residents of Edgebrook Estates, a trailer park just outside the village, as well as Streamside Manor and another apartment complex.
    “We’re holding our own,” said Frankfort Village Clerk Karlee Tamburro. “We’re getting in shipments of cots and cases of water.”
    If the area receives another heavy rainfall, there could be real problems, she said.
    The village closed West Main Street and the 200 block of Third Avenue Monday evening due to flooding. West Main Street remained closed Tuesday morning, but was later reopened.
    The village has been under a state of emergency since last Friday, Tamburro said. She noted village officials were meeting Monday evening for an update on the emergency when they received word that the flooding was starting again.
    “You ought to be on the Doppler Radar,” said Frankfort Town Supervisor Joseph Kinney, who said he was watching as red, orange and yellow cells moved toward the area from Pennsylvania and downstate New York.
    He said things seemed to have “stabilized momentarily,” but town roads were heavily damaged in Friday’s flooding and the situation was exacerbated by additional heavy rain on Monday.
    “Eleven town roads have suffered damage ranging from minimal to significant,” he said.
    Kent Boulevard, Southside Road and Avery Road saw damage to both roads and culverts. Arch Street was also damaged along with the culvert.
    On Southside Road, the eastbound lane is closed due to the damage.
    “The problem we have is that the ground’s so saturated it’s just not holding any more water. These microbursts – we get too much water all at once and the water channels just can’t hold it,” said Kinney.
    There were flooded basements in the town, but he was not aware of any major structural damage to homes.
    Mohawk Mayor Jim Baron said there were excavators working in Fulmer Creek Tuesday, hoping to avert additional flooding. A long-term project is planned to put the creek back in its original channel on the flood plain.
    Page 2 of 2 - “That should help with this and also with ice jams,” he said.
    He said the village remains under a state of emergency. Power has been restored to most homes in the village – some 40 or 50 remain without due to heavy damage – but the village is still in energy conservation mode, he said.
    “Any time I’ve heard 2006 (June 2006 flood) referenced, everybody says it’s much worse than 2006,” Baron said. He added the Federal Emergency Management Agency has been surveying the damage from above in an effort to qualify the county and state for federal assistance. “Once they do, they will be around to address each individual household based on their needs,” he said. “There will be teams going door to door and a command post set up somewhere.”
    Asked about a monetary figure for the damage, Baron said the biggest hit was to the village power station. “That’s probably a $6 million bill at least,” he said.
    Boil water advisories remain in effect for Mohawk and Van Hornesville.

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