|
|
|
The Telegram
  • Election Q&A: 3-way race in 21st Congressional District

  • Incumbent U.S. Rep. Bill Owens, D - Plattsburgh, will face off against Republican Matthew Doheny and Green Party candidate Donald Hassig for the new 21st congressional seat Tuesday.

    • email print
  • HERKIMER — Incumbent U.S. Rep. Bill Owens, D - Plattsburgh, will face off against Republican Matthew Doheny and Green Party candidate Donald Hassig for the new 21st congressional seat Tuesday.
    Here are their responses to questions regarding the new district and what their plans are if elected.
    If elected, what is the first piece of legislation you would introduce?
    Owens: We would be reintroducing the Common Sense Waiver Act. It would give the Environmental Protection Agency the ability to get a waiver to remove buildings before they collapse. It would eliminate the collapse and eliminate the asbestos that could go in the air. Driving through communities, you’ll see more than a couple buildings that fit that category.
    Doheny: What I would do is four things. I would extend tax rates, change the regulatory regimen to come back to the House to be voted on. The third thing I would do is overturn Obamacare. The last thing I would do is give certainty on the job creations bill. Government officials aren’t going to get paid until they pass a budget.
    Hassig: It’s called the cancer elimination act. It has three different pieces. There is the education piece — it’s all about naming the chemicals that are known to cause cancer and how to limit your exposure. The second piece should be the testing of all the chemicals to figure out which are cancer causing and which are not, and phase out use of those found to be carcinogenic chemicals. The third is clean up of contaminated sites.
    How will you foster job growth in your district?
    Owens: In different parts of the district we have to do different things. Make sure Fort Drum remains strong. (In the) Northeast as well as the remaining Northern Tier, bring Canadian business. Near Glen Falls, you have to continue to develop high-tech industry. In the Mohawk Valley, (computer chip manufacturer) GlobalFoundaries is a great opportunity.
    Doheny: We’ve got to focus on three critical things. No. 1 is make sure we have the basic infrastructure so entrepreneurs can grow (for example, cellphone service). The second is remove the problems, which (is what) the first piece of legislation would do. No. 3, we need to work across the aisle, across the country to bring capital to our region.
    Hassig: Jobs would come from withdrawing from the World Trade Organization and the Free Trade Agreement. We sell jobs that used to be in America to another country. The living wage in a factory producing products that Americans want is a good job.
    What is your position on hydrofracking as well as natural gas infrastructure in the state?
    Owens: I think we’re moving in the right direction with hydrofracking through Gov. Andrew Cuomo. I think he’s got the right approach. Make sure we don’t create any environmental problems. If that can be established, I’m 100 percent for moving forward.
    Page 2 of 2 - Doheny: To be fair, in my district, the Marcellus shale doesn’t reach all the way up here. I am in favor of utilizing our own natural resources. There is wonderful job creation happening in tapping into natural gas. We have to make sure it’s done in a safe manner.
    Hassig: I’m totally opposed to hydrofracking. It’s ruining the Earth. It’s ruining the air. It’s ruining the water. It’s ruining the infrastructure with all the trucks. We don’t want to go super, hyper-industrialization of the land.
    Contributing: GateHouse News Service
      • calendar