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The Telegram
  • Frankfort-Schuyler board discusses emergency response time

  • While the Frankfort-Schuyler Central School District has an emergency plan in place, a school board member asked during last week’s meeting if local authorities also have a plan.

    School board President Lisa LoRe said a student was injured during an athletic event and had to wait some time before an ambulance arrived.

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  • While the Frankfort-Schuyler Central School District has an emergency plan in place, a school board member asked during last week’s meeting if local authorities also have a plan.
    School board President Lisa LoRe said a student was injured during an athletic event and had to wait some time before an ambulance arrived.
    Volunteers were not available locally and an ambulance responded from Ilion.
    “What if this had been a serious injury? How long would we have to wait,” asked LoRe.
    She also questioned what the liability would be to the district in such an instance.
    Superintendent Robert Reina said when local emergency responders were not available to respond to the school, the call went to mutual aid and an ambulance was called in from Ilion. He added the district makes sure its coaches have first aid training and, in the case LoRe mentioned, staff members trained in first aid were on hand and tried to make the student as comfortable as possible.
    LoRe also asked what kind of response time there might be in the case of an emergency such as the shooting in Newtown, Conn. Reina said he didn’t know, but noted the village and town police departments have an agreement that if there is a call at one of the schools, the department that arrives on the scene first will respond. While Reese Road Elementary School is in the town, but not the village, if Frankfort village police arrive first, they would respond.
    LoRe said the school has an emergency plan and conducts drills, but asked if the local police agencies have a crisis response plan. Reina said he knows the fire department has a plan, but did not know about the police. He said he would approach the town and village about the matter.
    He pointed out the village and town police had been in the district’s buildings during the week after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Some years ago, he said, school resource officers were placed in local schools, but when the funding ran out, the program was dropped. Reina said he has seen the resource officer program work well and said given recent events funding may again become available.
    Reina also reported on the vigil organized by the district’s Friends of Rachel club in memory of the Sandy Hook shooting victims. He estimated 400 to 500 people attended the event, some from outside the community, and said the senior choir and some alumni sang.
    One student videotaped the vigil and prepared a DVD to send to Newtown, Conn. Students and faculty members sent their condolences along with the DVD.
    People were asked to bring stuffed animals to the vigil and more than 500 were collected, but the following day the district received word that the community of Newtown, Conn., was asking people to refrain from sending more stuffed animals. They suggested the toys be donated to a local charity in memory of the children who were killed. Reina said the decision was made to send the stuffed animals to Neighborhood Center of Utica for use in their program to assist children dealing with family court issues.

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