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The Telegram
  • Ilion board to consider updating local laws

  • The Ilion village board will be looking to update some of its local laws.

    Village Clerk Linda Coffin asked the board during a meeting Wednesday to consider making changes to bring the local laws governing amusement centers and on peddling and soliciting up to date.

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  • The Ilion village board will be looking to update some of its local laws.
    Village Clerk Linda Coffin asked the board during a meeting Wednesday to consider making changes to bring the local laws governing amusement centers and on peddling and soliciting up to date.
    “Both regulations were put in place in the 1970s,” she said.
    Issues have arisen recently regarding village laws dealing with “amusement devices.” Under the law, any indoor facility which offers coin-operated machines is called an amusement center and all of the machines are required to be licensed. Now such machines are placed in a number of area businesses, such as restaurants, which could not be described as amusement centers. There are also many kinds of machines, including those that offer toys for children and machines that dispense food or drinks. In accordance with the local law, the person or company placing machines must pay a $10 application fee and $50 for each machine in a facility.
    “We need to define amusement device,” said Trustee Barbara Collea.
    Coffin asked for input from the board to clarify what types of machines should be licensed, which should be exempted, such as those placed by non-profit organizations, and to make sure there is a clear enforcement clause. She said one person placing machines in local businesses has been insistent the law does not apply to the machines he is placing and no fee should be required.
    “The law needs to be reviewed and have modern terminology added,” she said.
    Coffin expressed similar concerns about the law dealing with peddlers and solicitors, as a number of vendors have been selling items, including food, door-to-door in the village.
    Vendors should have to show proper paperwork, according to Deputy Mayor Beth Neale, who conducted the meeting in the absence of Mayor John Stephens. She said there is the possibility a family could become ill from a contaminated product sold by a vendor.
    Proof of insurance and workers’ compensation could be required, said Coffin.
    Once she receives input from the board on the direction the trustees want to go, Coffin said, she would work with Hage and Hage attorneys to revamp the laws. She asked board members to give her some directions on the laws by the board’s April 24 meeting.
    Some other village codes need to be reviewed and updated as well, according to Coffin. For example, a cat license is $2.50 for the life of the cat under one village law. “That’s one you might want to consider down the line,” she said.
    The board conducted a public hearing on the 2013 Community Development Block Grant application. The program, under the Mohawk Valley Regional Development Council, has $8 million in grant money and the village plans to submit a pre-application for funds to pay for sewer repairs in a portion of the village.
    Page 2 of 2 - No community residents attended the hearing.
    The board could not come to an agreement on paying bills. Collea wanted more information on a bill from Hage and Hage regarding an investigation involving a village employee and asked why she and the other trustees were not informed about it. Neale said the mayor had recused himself from the matter and she had handled it as part of the daily operations of the village. She added the investigation did not turn up any wrongdoing. Collea said there was no public record about the matter and pointed out the village was being asked to pay for more than 58 hours of work.
    Neale said if anything had come from the investigation, the matter would have come to the board. “For what purpose would I hang someone out to dry with no reason,” she asked.
    Collea and Trustee Robert Wellington voted to pay all of the bills except the hourly bill from Hage and Hage, but Neale voted against the resolution. While only three board members were present for Wednesday’s meeting, a majority of the full five-member board is needed to pass a resolution. Board members said they would meet in special session to discuss the bills.
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